Contact Lenses and Cosmetics

On August 25th, 2010, posted in: Contact Lenses by

Here are some tips to help you wear your contacts and your cosmetics safely and comfortably together:

  • Put on soft contact lenses before applying makeup.
  • Put on rigid gas-permeable (RGP) lenses after makeup is applied.
  • Avoid lash-extending mascara, which has fibers that can irritate the eyes, and waterproof mascara, which cannot be easily removed with water and may stain soft contact lenses.
  • Remove lenses before removing makeup.
  • Choose an oil-free moisturizer.
  • Don’t use hand creams or lotions before handling contacts. They can leave a film on your lenses.
  • Use hairspray before putting on your contacts. If you use hairspray while you are wearing your contacts, close your eyes during spraying and for a few seconds afterwards.
  • Blink your eyes frequently while under a hair drier or blower to keep your eyes from getting too dry.
  • Keep false eyelash cement, nail polish and remover, perfume and cologne away from the lenses. They can damage the plastic.
  • Choose water-based, hypo-allergenic liquid foundations. Cream makeup may leave a film on your lenses.

 

Information courtesy of the American Optometric Association, 3/14/11

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Monovision

On August 25th, 2010, posted in: Contact Lenses by

Monovision is a treatment technique that is often prescribed for people age 40 and older who are affected by presbyopia. Presbyopia occurs when, as part of the natural aging process (See: The Aging Eye), the eye’s crystalline lens loses its ability to bring close objects into clear focus.

Monovision means wearing a contact lens for near vision on one eye and, if needed, a lens for distance vision on the other eye.

Most people who try monovision are able to adjust to it.

Alternative treatments for presbyopia include a combination of contact lenses and reading glasses, or your doctor may also prescribe bifocal contact lenses.

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Information courtesy of the American Optometric Association, 3/14/11

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It is generally not difficult to wear contact lenses. Following your doctor’s advice and regular follow-up care will prevent most problems.

However, here is a list of some signs that things may not be going well. If you experience any of these, contact your optometrist at Kaster Eye Clinic of Green as soon as possible.

  • Blurred or fuzzy vision, especially of sudden onset.
  • Red, irritated eyes.
  • Uncomfortable lenses.
  • Pain in and around the eyes.

 

Information courtesy of the American Optometric Association, 3/14/11

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Cost of Contact Lenses

On August 25th, 2010, posted in: Contact Lenses by

Every optometrist individually determines his or her fees for services. There are a number of factors that may go into determining the initial cost of contact lenses, and these may include the professional services necessary to provide the best lens selection and a good start toward safe, successful wear. If you are considering contacts, be aware that some of the services and materials that might be included in the initial cost are:

  • a thorough diagnostic eye examination;
  • a lens care kit;
  • lens wear and care training;
  • follow-up office visits over a specified period of time.

If you already wear lenses and need replacements, or if you want a spare pair, the total cost might include the actual cost of the lenses plus the fee the doctor might charge for his or her professional time. Again, every optometrist individually determines his or her fees, and there is no formula or standard fee for contacts or professional services.

It is certainly important to check out costs when considering contacts, but cost is just one factor in making your decision. All types of lenses are not the same. It is important for you to get the lenses that are healthiest for you and the professional services and follow-up care to help you wear your lenses successfully.

 

Information courtesy of the American Optometric Association, 3/14/11

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The American Optometric Association (AOA) is warning consumers about the risks of wearing decorative contact lenses sold without proper medical evaluation from a doctor of optometry and without a prescription.  These non-corrective lenses are easily accessible to consumers and are especially popular around Halloween.

Decorative lenses, also referred to as plano lenses, are marketed and distributed directly to consumers through a variety of sources, including flea markets, the Internet, beauty salons and convenience stores. Consumers often find them at retail outlets where they are sold as fashion accessories. 

“Buying contact lenses without a prescription can pose serious risk to your sight or eye health,” said Art Epstein, O.D., former chairman of the AOA Contact Lens and Cornea Section. “Decorative lenses, like their vision-correcting counterparts, require precise fitting and careful follow-up care.  Consumers purchasing these lenses from untrained individuals may receive poorly fitted or “demo” lenses and little to no instruction in proper lens care and cleaning.” 

People who buy and wear contact lenses without medical guidance and a valid prescription put themselves at risk for serious, even blinding eye infections.  A proper medical evaluation ensures that the patient is an appropriate candidate for contact lens wear, that the lenses are properly fitted and that the patient is able to safely care for their lenses.

“While consumer education is important, it is equally imperative to ensure that laws are in place so that only people who are trained in the proper fitting and appropriate use of contacts are able to provide them to patients,” said Dr. Epstein.  “This is a serious public health issue, especially for adolescents and young adults,” he added.

“Consumers and retailers should understand that decorative lenses, like the contact lenses intended for correcting vision, present serious risks to eye health if they are distributed without the appropriate involvement of a qualified eye care professional,” added Dr. Epstein.

Other risks associated with use of decorative contact lenses include conjunctivitis (pink eye), swelling, allergic reactions and corneal abrasion due to poor lens fit. Other problems may include reduced vision, glare, and other general eye and vision impairments.

 

Information courtesy of the American Optometric Association, 3/14/11

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