Whether you already wear contact lenses or are considering them, this section serves as a primer. Facts and statistics about contact lens wearers, pointers for safe and successful use of contact lenses, and contact lenses and cosmetics are just a few of the topics covered here.

Getting started right with your contact lenses involves going to an eye doctor who provides full-service care, such as Kaster Eye Clinic of Green. This includes a thorough eye examination, an evaluation of your suitability for contact lens wear, the lenses, necessary lens care kits, individual instructions for wear and care and unlimited follow-up visits over a specified time.

 

Information courtesy of the American Optometric Association, 3/14/11

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Contact lenses are among the safest forms of vision correction when patients follow the proper care and wearing instructions provided by their eye doctor. However, when patients do not use lenses as directed, the consequences may be dangerous. In fact, contact lens wearers could be damaging their eyes by not using proper hygiene in caring for their lenses.

Contact lenses and the solutions used with them are medical devices and are regulated by the Food and Drug Administration, therefore, it is extremely important that patients maintain regular appointments to ensure they are receiving clinical guidance from their eye doctor based on individual eye health needs.

Clean and safe handling of contact lenses is one of the most important measures contact lens wearers can take to protect their sight. Exercising optimal care and hygiene with contact lenses can keep the eyes healthy.

Recommendations for Contact Lens Wearers from the American Optometric Association

  1. Always wash and dry your hands before handling contact lenses.
  2. Carefully and regularly clean contact lenses, as directed by your eye doctor. Rub the contact lenses with fingers and rinse thoroughly before soaking lenses overnight in sufficient multi-purpose solution to completely cover the lens.
  3. Store lenses in the proper lens storage case and replace your case every three months or sooner.  Clean the case after each use, and keep it open and dry between cleanings.
  4. Use only products recommended by your eye doctor to clean and disinfect your lenses. Saline solution and rewetting drops are not designed to disinfect lenses.
  5. Only fresh solution should be used to clean and store contact lenses. Never re-use old solution. Contact lens solution must be changed according to the manufacturer’s recommendations, even if the lenses are not used daily.
  6. Always follow the recommended contact lens replacement schedule prescribed by your eye doctor.
  7. Remove contact lenses before swimming or entering a hot tub.
  8. See your eye doctor for your regularly scheduled contact lens and eye examination.

 

 

Information courtesy of the American Optometric Association, 3/14/11

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Contacts Facts and Stats

On August 25th, 2010, posted in: Contact Lenses by

So you want to wear contact lenses. Well, you’re not alone. Let’s take a quick look at who is wearing contact lenses today.

  • Over 30 million Americans wear contact lenses
  • Two-thirds of all contact lens wearers are female
  • Ten percent are age 18 or under
  • Fifteen percent are between the ages of 18-24
  • 50 percent are 25 to 44 years old
  • Most contact lens wearers are nearsighted
  • Eighty percent wear daily wear soft lenses
  • Over fifty percent wear 1 to 2-week disposable lenses
  • Fifteen percent wear extended wear soft lenses
  • More than 80 percent of contact lens wearers go to an optometrist for their eye care.

Source: Contact Lens Institute
May 2003

 

Information courtesy of the American Optometric Association, 3/14/11

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Lens Types Advantages Disadvantages
Rigid gas-permeable (RGP)

Made of slightly flexible plastics that allow oxygen to pass through to the eyes.

Excellent vision… short adaptation period… comfortable to wear… correct most vision problems… easy to put on and to care for… durable with a relatively long life… available in tints (for handling purposes) and bifocals. Require consistent wear to maintain adaptation… can slip off center of eye more easily than other types… debris can easily get under the lenses… requires office visits for follow-up care.
Daily-wear soft lenses

Made of soft, flexible plastic that allows oxygen to pass through to the eyes.

Very short adaptation period… more comfortable and more difficult to dislodge than RGP lenses… available in tints and bifocals… great for active lifestyles. Do not correct all vision problems… vision may not be as sharp as with RGP lenses… require regular office visits for follow-up care… lenses soil easily and must be replaced.
Extended-wear

Available for overnight wear in soft or RGP lenses.

Can usually be worn up to seven days without removal. Do not correct all vision problems… require regular office visits for follow-up care… increases risk of complication… requires regular monitoring and professional care.
Extended-wear disposable

Soft lenses worn for an extended period of time, from one to six days and then discarded.

Require little or no cleaning… minimal risk of eye infection if wearing instructions are followed… available in tints and bifocals… spare lenses available. Vision may not be as sharp as RGP lenses… do not correct all vision problems… handling may be more difficult.
Planned replacement

Soft daily wear lenses that are replaced on a planned schedule, most often either every two weeks, monthly or quarterly.

Require simplified cleaning and disinfection… good for eye health… available in most prescriptions. Vision may not be as sharp as RGP lenses… do not correct all vision problems… handling may be more difficult.

Reasons To Consider Contact Lenses

  • Contact lenses move with your eye, allow a natural field of view, have no frames to obstruct your vision and greatly reduce distortions.
  • They do not fog up, like glasses, nor do they get splattered by mud or rain.
  • Contact lenses do not get in the way of your activities.
  • Many people feel they look better in contact lenses.
  • Contact lenses, compared to eyeglasses, generally offer better sight.

Some Things To Remember About Contact Lenses

  • Contact lenses, when compared with glasses, require a longer initial examination and more follow-up visits to maintain eye health; and more time for lens care.
  • If you are going to wear your lenses successfully, you will have to clean and store them properly; adhere to lens wearing schedules; and make follow-up eye care appointments at Kaster Eye Clinic of Green.
  • If you are wearing disposable or planned replacement lenses, you will have to carefully follow the schedule for throwing away used lenses.

 

Information courtesy of the American Optometric Association, 3/14/11

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Contacts Do’s and Don’ts

On August 25th, 2010, posted in: Contact Lenses by

Get started off right with your contact lenses by going to a eye doctor, such as Kaster Eye Clinic of Green, who provides full-service care. Full-service care may include the following items: a thorough eye examination, an evaluation of your suitability for contact lens wear, the lenses, necessary lens care kits, individual instructions for wear and care, and follow-up visits over a specified time. The initial visit and examination can take an hour or longer. Here is a list of other specific do’s and don’ts to lead you to successful wear.

Do:

  • Always wash your hands before handling contact lenses.
  • Carefully and regularly clean contact lenses, as directed by your optometrist. If recommended, rub the contact lenses with fingers and rinse thoroughly before soaking lenses overnight in sufficient multi-purpose solution to completely cover the lens.
  • Store lenses in the proper lens storage case and replace the case at a minimum of every three months. Clean the case after each use, and keep it open and dry between cleanings.
  • Only fresh solution should be used to clean and store contact lenses. Never Re-use old solution. Contact lens solution must be changed according to the manufacturer’s recommendations, even if the lenses are not used daily.
  • Always follow the recommended contact lens replacement schedule prescribed by your optometrist.
  • Remove contact lenses before swimming or entering a hot tub.
  • Avoid tap water to wash or store contact lenses or lens cases.
  • See your optometrist at Kaster Eye Clinic of Green for your regularly scheduled contact lens and eye examination.

Don’t:

  • Use cream soaps. They can leave a film on your hands that can transfer to the lenses.
  • Use homemade saline solutions. Improper use of homemade saline solutions has been linked with a potentially blinding condition among soft lens wearers.
  • Put contact lenses in your mouth or moisten them with saliva, which is full of bacteria and a potential source of infection.
  • Use tap water to wash or store contact lenses or lens cases.
  • Share lenses with others.
  • Use products not recommended by your optometrist to clean and disinfect your lenses. Saline solution and rewetting drops are not designed to disinfect lenses.

 

Information courtesy of the American Optometric Association, 3/14/11

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